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'skin cancer' Category Archives

Sunscreen – Who needs it?

Sunscreen – Who needs it?

The simple answer is everyone. Sunscreen protects against the harmful UVA and UVB rays which can cause skin cancer and skin ageing. The fairer your skin the more essential sunscreen becomes. The risk of skin cancer is greater in those with lighter skin types, though Asian and African skins can prevent much of the changes associated with ageing (wrinkles, uneven skin tone and pigmentation) by using sunscreen year round whilst reducing further their already small risk of skin cancer.

Which Sunscreen Should I Use?

The BAD (British Association of Dermatologists) recommends that you should use a sunscreen that provides broad spectrum protection (against UVA and B). SPF (Sun Protection Factor) refers to UVB protection and the BAD advises using SPF 30 or above. UVA protection is indicated by either an EU standard mark (UVA in a circle) or the Boots star system – 4 or 5 stars indicates very good protection.

Water resistance is a useful addition if you are likely to be sweating as it will not run and important if you are swimming. However, it is essential to reapply after swimming or towelling as it will have washed/rubbed off. There are many types of sunscreen in different formulations. Ultimately, you should use one that you feel comfortable applying generously – both from a cosmetic perspective and financial.

When Should I Use Sunscreen?

Whenever you will be outdoors in daylight for more than about 15 minutes, but also be aware that UVA (which is the main cause of ageing) can penetrate through glass, so you will still be exposed sitting in a car. Ideally,  year-round as the UVA levels are fairly consistent year round and even when there is cloud cover. UVB causes burning and these levels increase with the intensity of the sun.

How Much Sunscreen Should I Use?

Probably more than you are at the moment! Most people do not use enough to achieve the quoted SPF. Some people suggest a shot glass worth, or a teaspoon per body part such as arms, legs, face and each side of the body, but I find these difficult concepts in practice, so I usually advise people to put enough on so that the skin looks completely white before the cream goes in.
It should be applied about 20 minutes before going out and then every two hours, or after swimming or toweling.

What is Altruist Dermatologist Sunscreen?

ALTRUIST: A sunscreen recommended by dermatologists

Developed by Dr Andrew Birnie in partnership with some of the best formulation scientists in Europe. Altruist has a broad range of photostable UV filters, including the most advanced filter Tinosorb A2B. Fabulous cosmetic feel – easily absorbed, non-sticky and no residue. Hypoallergenic and fragrance free.

According to Sue Ibrahim, our Nurse Consultant in Dermatology, cost should not be a barrier to regular use of sunscreen. Altruist is able to offer sunscreen at an affordable price, because of reduced profit margins and unnecessary marketing costs.  ‘It is our mission to reduce the incidence of skin cancer through the increased use of quality sunscreen together with better education and awareness. This sunscreen has been formulated to be acceptable to all skin types. Moreover, Altruist donates to charities supporting children with albinism’.

Altruist Sunscreen SPF50 100ml only costs £4 from Elan Medical Skin Clinic in Essex

  • Broad spectrum UVA and UVB protection
  • Exceeds EU recommendations for UVA protection
  • Clinically tested
  • Easily absorbed, non-sticky and no residue
  • Daily use on face and body
  • Excellent tolerability
  • Fragrance and paraben free
  • Water resistant

Click here to purchase this product now.

Altruist Sunscreen SPF30 200ml only costs £4 from Elan Medical Skin Clinic in Essex

  • Broad spectrum UVA and UVB protection
  • SPF 30 and exceeds EU recommendations for UVA protection
  • Clinically tested
  • Fabulous cosmetic feel – easily absorbed, non-sticky and no residue
  • Suitable for daily use on the face and body
  • Excellent tolerability
  • Hypoallergenic formulation
  • Fragrance and paraben free
  • Water resistant

Click here to purchase this product now.

1. UV protection: 
A broad rang of photostable and photostabilised UV filters, including the most advanced filter available Tinosorb A2B, to ensure that quality protection is provided across the whole UVA/UVB spectrum. All of these are formulated at moderate concentrations in order to avoid any adverse reaction. This results in high quality UVA and UVB protection, exceeding EU standards.

2. Moisturising
To keep sufficient moisture in the skin glycerine (3%) and panthenol (0.3%) are formulated into the water phase at moderate concentration, to maintain hydration without exaggerating the moisturising effect associated with excessive glycerine.

3. Emulsion
The emulsion is formulated to optimise the distribution of sun filters on the skin, resulting in high SPF levels.

4. Preservatives 
Molecules with known allergic potential like parabens, CMIT, MIT, bronopol, benzyl alcohol, IPBC etc. are avoided. Therefore a mixture of phenoxyethanol (0.3 %), silver choride (20 ppm), piroctone olamine (0.1 %) supported by caprylyl glycol was selected. This combination is especially designed to avoid the odour of many preservatives and to minimise any risk of skin sensitisation or allergy

 

Under The Same Sun Charity

Altruist and Elan Medical Skin Clinic supports Under The Same Sun, a charity supporting children with albinism in Tanzania and the rest of Africa. We believe everybody should have an equal opportunity to be protected from the sun. With each purchase we will donate 10p. By buying Altruist, you can help albino children in Africa!   

Why is having albinism such an issue?

In Tanzania, an many parts of Africa, having albinism is a sentence to a harsh life and early death.

Albinism is a genetic condition, more prevalent in Africa. It results in a person looking white due to a lack of pigmentation in the hair, skin and eyes. People with albinism are visually impaired and highly vulnerable to sun exposure resulting in high rates of skin cancer.

Societal ignorance about the condition, as well as long-standing beliefs associated with witchcraft, lead to the dehumanization of people with albinism. It is widely believed that the body parts of people with albinism, used by witch doctors in magical charms and potions, bring wealth, health and good luck. This leads to brutal attacks resulting in maiming, death and the black market trafficking of albino body parts.Since 2006, more than 300 attacks have been recorded in 25 countries, and likely many more have gone unrecorded.

Under The Same Sun supports people with albinism in Tanzania with hats, locally made sunscreen,  education and involves in the local community.

Skin Cancer Screening in Essex

Skin Cancer Screening, Mole Checking and Mole Removal Services

Whether you are concerned about a suspicious mole, or keen to keep a close eye on all your skin changes, our Nurse Consultant in Dermatology at Elan Medical Skin Clinic in Rayleigh, Essex can provide you with the reassurance that you will receive the correct diagnosis in a timely fashion. Appointments for skin cancer screening or mole checks can normally be booked within a few days. For the small number of patients diagnosed with skin cancer, a proactive approach is more likely to lead to less treatment and an improved cosmetic and overall outcome.

Mole Removal in Essex

Skin Cancer Screening is more than just checking moles with a naked eye

When should I get my moles checked?

If a mole has changed recently, or it has suspicious features, your GP will arrange referral to a plastic surgeon or dermatologist who has a special interest in skin cancer. This service is available in the NHS, although waiting times to be seen in a clinic can be many weeks, or privately if you have medical insurance or want to pay for treatment. Mole removal is advised if you have noticed a mole that:

  • Has increased in size
  • Has changed in colour
  • Is over 7mm in size
  • Has an irregular shape
  • Has an irregular colour
  • Is inflamed or oozing

Although the majority of moles that present with these clinical signs will not be cancerous, a small proportion will contain malignant cells and may require further treatment following initial mole removal. Black or dark brown moles may be a sign of melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer that can result in patient mortality. If you have noticed any of the above features you should consider seeking medical advice.

Skin Cancer Screening

This service is for anyone with concerns about new or growing moles. This involves a detailed examination of your moles, and a complete skin examination, to give you peace of mind and ensure early detection of any problems.

mole checks

Skin lesions being checked using a special piece of equipment called a dermatoscope

One-Stop Mole Removal

This fast-track service is for anyone that wants a mole removing because it is suspicious of cancer or they feel it is unsightly. You can book an appointment at our Medical Skin Clinic in Rayleigh, Essex. Moles removed within the clinic will be sent to a pathologist for interpretation.

How do I book an appointment?

You can either call Elan Medical Skin Clinic on 01268 770660 between 9.30am and 5pm Monday to Saturday or you can book your skin cancer screening appointment by going to our online booking form and one of our reception team will contact you by phone or email, whichever you prefer. You will be asked to pay your initial consultation fee by credit or debit card on confirming your appointment.

Mole checking is vital says London skin expert

Woman has her moles checked by a professional - Mole checking is essential says Sue Ibrahim the nurse consultant in dermatology from Elan Medical Clinics in central London and Essex

Mole checking is essential says Sue Ibrahim the nurse consultant in dermatology from Elan Medical Clinics in central London and Essex

Moles, brown spots and growths on the skin are usually harmless, but not always. If you have a certain type or large number of moles (more than 100), you are at greater risk of developing skin cancer.

The ABCDE method for checking moles is very useful but if in doubt, getting them professionally assessed is vital, says Sue Ibrahim. Sue, the nurse consultant in dermatology at Elan Medical Skin Clinics, has more than 30 years’ experience of assessing and removing moles using the latest advanced radio-wave technology. Click here to read reviews from her clients.

Asymmetry

If you draw a line through the middle of a mole, the two sides will match, meaning it is symmetrical. Anything asymmetrical is a warning sign for melanoma.

Read More…

Essex skin expert explains how to stay safe in the sun

With the temperature hitting highs of 35 degrees in central London and Essex this week, it’s time to get out and enjoy this illusive summer sunshine but please stay safe.

Some sunshine is good for us and helps our bodies create vitamin D, not to mention the wellbeing and feel good factors it

Woman stays safe in the sun thanks to advice from Elan Medical Skin expert, Sue Ibrahim

Woman stays safe in the sun thanks to advice from Elan Medical Skin expert, Sue Ibrahim

induces. Essex skin expert, Sue Ibrahim at Elan Medical Skin Clinic says the best way to enjoy the sunshine safely is to use a daily, broad spectrum sunscreen of factor 30 + and remember to apply it frequently and liberally thoroughly the day.

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Essex skin expert talks sun spots and how to avoid them

Age spots, sun spots, actinic keratoses, senile lentigo or solar lentigines, call them what you like!

These flat, brown, gray or black spots are areas of sun-damaged skin found predominantly on sun-exposed parts of the body. These include the backs of the hands and forearms, the face, ears and lips, the scalp in balding men and the lower legs in women, says Essex nurse consultant in dermatology, Sue Ibrahim from Elan Medical Skin Clinics in Rayleigh and central London.

They are not contagious and are usually harmless but there is a very small risk of some sun spots developing into to a form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

Seek professional help if you’re worried

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