Do you think I have Rosacea?

Rosacea is a common rash, found on the central part of the face, that usually occurs in the mid-thirties or early forties. It can occur in both men and women who have no history of acne as a teenager.

Rosacea is a progressive skin condition that often begins with a tendency to flush (blush). After a while this is followed by persistent redness on the cheeks, chin, forehead and nose, and by crops of small inflamed red bumps and pus spots. Rosacea can also affect the eyes, making them irritated.

A woman considers speaking to a skin expert at Elan Medical Skin Clinics in Essex and central London

A woman considers speaking to a skin expert at Elan Medical Skin Clinics in Essex about her rosacea.

What causes Rosacea? 

The cause of rosacea is not fully understood, but many think that the defect lies in the blood vessels in the skin of the face, which dilate too easily and recent studies are linking rosacea with the Demodex mite, that feeds off of our dead skin cells. Rosacea is more common in women than in men, and in those with a fair skin who flush easily but men tend to get a more aggressive form of Rosacea.

Many things seem to make rosacea worse, but probably do not cause it in the first place. They include alcohol, too much exercise, both high and low temperatures, hot spicy foods, stress, and sunlight. Things that stir up one person’s rosacea may well have no effect at all on the rosacea of someone else. The idea that rosacea is due to germs in the skin, or in the bowel, has not been proved. Rosacea is not catching.

Is Rosacea hereditary?

Rosacea does seem to run in some families but it is still not clear whether heredity plays a big part in this.

What are the symptoms of Rosacea?

Rosacea starts with a tendency to blush and flush easily. After a while, the central areas of the face become a deeper shade of red and end up staying this colour all the time. The area becomes studded with small red bumps (papules) and pus spots, which come and go in crops. Small dilated blood vessels (telangiectasia) appear, looking like thin red streaks. Scarring is seldom a problem.

Other problems with rosacea include the following:

  • Rosacea can lead to embarrassment, anxiety, or depression, and a disrupted social life. 
  • The face may swell (lymphoedema), especially around the eyes. 
  • The nose may grow big, red and bulbous (rhinophyma) due to the overgrowth of the sebaceous glands. This is more common in men than women. 
  • Some people with rosacea have eye symptoms (red, itchy, sore eyes and eyelids; a gritty feeling; sensitivity to light). A few patients with rosacea have more serious eye problems, such as rosacea keratitis, that can interfere with vision. 

How will Rosacea be diagnosed? 

Unfortunately, many doctors can trivialise the effects rosacea can have on a person’s confidence, self-esteem and quality of life. Having spent over 30 years working within medical dermatology, Sue Ibrahim is passionate about treating acne early and effectively as she fully understands the consequences of living this rosacea on a daily basis. At Elan Medical Skin Clinic in Essex, we take the time to listen to your concerns and devise a management plan to get your skin looking great again!

Can Rosacea be cured?

No treatment can be guaranteed to switch rosacea off forever. However long-term treatments control symptoms and can clear the spots and reduce the facial flushing and dilated blood vessels. Treatment works best if started when rosacea is at an early stage.

How do we treat Rosacea?

Many thousands of people have been treated by Sue Ibrahim for their rosacea at Elan Medical Skin Clinic in Essex.

If you are fed up with suffering from acne or any other skin condition, why not book your dermatology consultation now!